Come with me to the garden of the new creation. This is the morning of the resurrection, and Jesus is having a conversation with Mary Magdalene.

Mary realized that she is not talking with the gardener, she is speaking with Jesus. Continue Reading…

Living Forward book reviewIn March I read the excellent new book, Living Forward, by Michael Hyatt and Daniel Harkavy. I invited my boss to go through the book with me as well. After I read the book I immediately began to implement the authors’ recommendations.

Living Forward is a book that brings both your heart and mind together to determine what you really want in life and to chart a course to get there. Unlike any other nonfiction business book I’ve read, this book stops you in your tracks to compare your daily actions with what you want your legacy to be. (Just wait until you read chapters 4 and 5. They’ll give you a brand new perspective on your life’s work!)

“The question is not, ‘Will you leave a legacy?’ but ‘What kind of legacy will you leave?’” Living Forward, p. 61

You will discover these direct benefits of reading the book:

Continue Reading…

…is a lie.

You can be anything or go into any career you want are related lies.

Dear graduates (and others who are continuing your education), if you think that you’re going to be an engineer but hate math class, you’re not going to be an engineer.

If you want to be a nurse but get sick every time you see blood, or can’t spend all day around people standing on your feet, you’re not going to get very far in medical school.

We’ve been told that there are unlimited opportunities in today’s marketplace. There are. However, that doesn’t mean you’re well-suited for all of them.

You’re created to excel in a few specific ways.

Your job, while you’re young, is to experiment and found out what you’re great at doing. Not just good. Great.

One great resource to use to start this journey: Stand Out Strengths by Marcus Buckingham (play to your strengths, instead of fixing weaknesses). If you get the book, take the assessment: it’s only 15 minutes and really cool!

but-im-too-old

“grandma #1” by flickr user Piotr | cc by 2.0

A year and a half ago I met a local author at a craft show. She is a retired schoolteacher and was selling her series of three children’s books. The books were beautifully done and even included matching bookmarks.

I asked her about the books and why she wrote for children. I quickly looked through one of the stories and complemented her on her work.

Then I asked, “You have three. Will you write more books?”

“No,” she said, “I’m too old for that.” Continue Reading…

We forget that money gives its value – that someone exchanged work for it.

Quote about money by Neal O’Hara

The following is an excerpt from the study guide portion of my latest book, A Couple with Common Cents.

As I observe marriage relationships, I find that one spouse likes to take more risks than the other. This is true in my own marriage.

But each spouse also has his and her own ways of taking risks that the other person does not.

Perhaps you love to travel, explore new places, or climb mountains like my wife, Lori. When you take a first glance at us, you might think she’s the one prone to more “risk,” if you just look at what she likes to talk about or how she drives the car.

Or perhaps you can handle more fiscal risk. You spend money on investments or opportunities that don’t have a clear guarantee. There’s a huge upside if it goes right, but there’s also potential for loss.

In your marriage, I would bet that one of you is financially more conservative than the other. One of you likes to save, while the other one spends. One of you will give away all your money, while the other one says, “Slow down!” Continue Reading…